Tag Archives: security

Episode 137: Apple’s job is not to make it easy as possible for law enforcement

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We discuss the big encryption battle between Apple (and other tech companies) and the FBI.

We discuss why we need encryption. Every person needs and deserves encryption. Criminals and hackers don’t just go after the government, they also go after individuals. Encryption helps keep individual citizens safe from people who want to steal their data, money and identity. Is that not worth protecting?

It’s not Apple’s job, nor anyone’s to make it as easy as possible for law enforcement. That’s why we have the Constitution and other protections.

We also review the new Quartz iPhone and Apple Watch app.

It is certainly unique.

Listen to this week’s episode:

 

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Show notes:

Episode 71: Twitter is not secure enough for news orgs and pros to use

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When hackers are tweeting out fake assassination attempts on the president from reputable news outlet’s Twitter accounts, you know we have an issue.

There have been a string of high profile Twitter hacking cases. The issue is fairly simple: Twitter is not an enterprise tool. It even has significantly less security than Gmail and some other Web apps.

But Twitter is used by large organizations all over the world. Why don’t they care more about security? It threatens the entire legitimacy of Twitter.

Yes, two-factor authentication would be a start, but Twitter needs a lot more than that. And companies would be willing to pay for added security, accounts and features.

We then discuss House of Cards, Netflix and whether or not people care about the anticipation of waiting for new episodes to come out week after week.

Listen to this week’s show:

 

Download the MP3

Show notes: 

OS X Lion is significantly more secure than older versions

There are a lot of reasons to upgrade to OS X Lion, and Jeremy and I do believe it’s the right choice for most of you, but Lion’s better security should be at the top of anyone’s list.

The new security enhancements are something that all computer users will appreciate and, frankly, need. Sandboxing in particular is big — BIG:

Running an application inside a sandbox is meant to minimize the damage that could be caused if that application is compromised by a piece of malware. A sandboxed application voluntarily surrenders the ability to do many things that a normal process run by the same user could do. For example, a normal application run by a user has the ability to delete every single file owned by that user. Obviously, a well-behaved application will not do this. But if an application becomes compromised, it may be coerced into doing something destructive.

In Lion, the sandbox security model has been greatly enhanced, and Apple is finally promoting it for use by third-party applications.

iOS and ChromeOS are both sandboxed OSes, which is major reason they are so secure. Essentially a sandbox keeps an application in its own little playground where it can’t hurt anything outside of itself. Apple is ramping up its sandboxing efforts in a major way, and by this Novemeber, all apps sold in the Mac App Store will have to be support sandboxing.

It’s not hard to imagine a future where Apple has a toggle switch that allows users to prevent non-Mac App Store apps from being installed on their machines. I can’t wait until everything I run on OS X is sandboxed.

Companies such as Adobe and Microsoft may be slow to move to sandboxing, which is one reason I’m switching away from their products. Apple updated its iWork suite to support all of the new features of OS X Lion, and it should be updated this fall to support iCloud. So while Word and Excel may have more features than Documents and Numbers, I prefer the modern features, security and syncing that I can enjoy with iWork (autosave versions and resume are huge features that every user will love and in a year will wonder how they ever lived without).

We’ll be talking and writing more about security and some of the other new features of Lion this week and next.