Tag Archives: OS X

Episode 7: Why don’t you go ahead and just write me a letter

Note: This is a repost of Episode 7 do to an issue with our podcast host.

We kick off talking about the #fuckyouwashington hash tag that Jeff Jarvis started.

Does the profanity bother us? No. Does Twitter censoring the hashtag  bother us? Yes.

We also delve deeper into Lion after using it for a week. We discuss AirDrop, the feature seemingly few are talking about. We go deeper into Lion’s new security features.

We also discuss how Patrick may get a new computer setup, and we spend a long time debating Macbook Airs vs. Macbook Pros.

And we had several other topics that we wanted to touch one, but this podcast aims to dig deep into topics. So that’s all we got to.

We’d also like to thank Alan Smodic for joining us during our Google+ Hangout before the show. Each week before the show we have a public Google+ Hangout where we go over what we’ll talk about on the show and try to get some early thoughts out. We’ll tweet out the link and share it on our Google+ accounts.

Listen to this week’s podcast:

 

Download the MP3

Show notes:

OS X Lion is significantly more secure than older versions

There are a lot of reasons to upgrade to OS X Lion, and Jeremy and I do believe it’s the right choice for most of you, but Lion’s better security should be at the top of anyone’s list.

The new security enhancements are something that all computer users will appreciate and, frankly, need. Sandboxing in particular is big — BIG:

Running an application inside a sandbox is meant to minimize the damage that could be caused if that application is compromised by a piece of malware. A sandboxed application voluntarily surrenders the ability to do many things that a normal process run by the same user could do. For example, a normal application run by a user has the ability to delete every single file owned by that user. Obviously, a well-behaved application will not do this. But if an application becomes compromised, it may be coerced into doing something destructive.

In Lion, the sandbox security model has been greatly enhanced, and Apple is finally promoting it for use by third-party applications.

iOS and ChromeOS are both sandboxed OSes, which is major reason they are so secure. Essentially a sandbox keeps an application in its own little playground where it can’t hurt anything outside of itself. Apple is ramping up its sandboxing efforts in a major way, and by this Novemeber, all apps sold in the Mac App Store will have to be support sandboxing.

It’s not hard to imagine a future where Apple has a toggle switch that allows users to prevent non-Mac App Store apps from being installed on their machines. I can’t wait until everything I run on OS X is sandboxed.

Companies such as Adobe and Microsoft may be slow to move to sandboxing, which is one reason I’m switching away from their products. Apple updated its iWork suite to support all of the new features of OS X Lion, and it should be updated this fall to support iCloud. So while Word and Excel may have more features than Documents and Numbers, I prefer the modern features, security and syncing that I can enjoy with iWork (autosave versions and resume are huge features that every user will love and in a year will wonder how they ever lived without).

We’ll be talking and writing more about security and some of the other new features of Lion this week and next.

Episode 6: Lion roars, Borders snores

Could we kick off this week’s show by talking about anything other than OS X Lion? 10.7 is a worthy update, and we give some initial impressions and who will and won’t like some of the updates.

I wrote another love letter to Spotify today, while Jeremy tried to understand what I was talking about.

Then we get into books, libraries and our love for things that other people may not love as much. It’s a great show. I promise.

Listen to this week’s podcast:
 

Download the MP3

Show notes: