Tag Archives: Numbers

Episode 10: Angry Avians (using the iPad for work)

We discuss how we use our iPads for work and how tablets can make us more productive.

Safari on the iPad would almost be worth the price of admission alone. It’s a really great app. So are Mail and iCal. We don’t discuss this built in apps, however, and instead focus on some of the really strong third-party apps that help us be more productive.

Here are some of the applications we talk about:

  • Omnioutliner¬†— A great outlining program, especially helpful in meetings.
  • Omnifocus — A GTD, task management program. Built for David Allen’s system. Very handy for staying on top of multiple projects at once.
  • Reeder — The best RSS program around, complete with great social media and Instapaper¬†integration.
  • Instapaper — If you love to read and reading is an important part of your job, you need Instapaper ASAP.
  • Twitterific — Our favorite Twitter app.
  • Kindle/iBooks — Great for reading books, papers and reports.
  • TripIt — Your travel companion.
  • Pages — Word processing on the go. Not bad for taking notes in meetings either.
  • Numbers — Spreadsheets on the go, also helpful for being able to view spreadsheets in meetings.
  • Keynote — Presentations on the go.
  • WordPress — Post to WordPress blogs, such as this site. Works better than logging in through the Web.

Listen to this week’s show:
 

Download the MP3

OS X Lion is significantly more secure than older versions

There are a lot of reasons to upgrade to OS X Lion, and Jeremy and I do believe it’s the right choice for most of you, but Lion’s better security should be at the top of anyone’s list.

The new security enhancements are something that all computer users will appreciate and, frankly, need. Sandboxing in particular is big — BIG:

Running an application inside a sandbox is meant to minimize the damage that could be caused if that application is compromised by a piece of malware. A sandboxed application voluntarily surrenders the ability to do many things that a normal process run by the same user could do. For example, a normal application run by a user has the ability to delete every single file owned by that user. Obviously, a well-behaved application will not do this. But if an application becomes compromised, it may be coerced into doing something destructive.

In Lion, the sandbox security model has been greatly enhanced, and Apple is finally promoting it for use by third-party applications.

iOS and ChromeOS are both sandboxed OSes, which is major reason they are so secure. Essentially a sandbox keeps an application in its own little playground where it can’t hurt anything outside of itself. Apple is ramping up its sandboxing efforts in a major way, and by this Novemeber, all apps sold in the Mac App Store will have to be support sandboxing.

It’s not hard to imagine a future where Apple has a toggle switch that allows users to prevent non-Mac App Store apps from being installed on their machines. I can’t wait until everything I run on OS X is sandboxed.

Companies such as Adobe and Microsoft may be slow to move to sandboxing, which is one reason I’m switching away from their products. Apple updated its iWork suite to support all of the new features of OS X Lion, and it should be updated this fall to support iCloud. So while Word and Excel may have more features than Documents and Numbers, I prefer the modern features, security and syncing that I can enjoy with iWork (autosave versions and resume are huge features that every user will love and in a year will wonder how they ever lived without).

We’ll be talking and writing more about security and some of the other new features of Lion this week and next.