Escaping the Internet is easier said than done

Paul Miller is trying to avoid the Internet for a year; that’s easier said than done:

The other day, while searching out the Knicks / Heat game with a casual internet user, we happened across a dingy bar he’d never visited before. The so-dive-it’s-cool scene is still active in NY, but this wasn’t that sort of place. There was one retired patron at the bar, some video slots in a corner, a few ancient flat-screens along the ceiling, and a smell of death. We asked if they were planning on showing the game.

“Yeah, are you showing the game?” said the patron, happy for some action.

“Oh, I forgot that was tonight,” said the middle-aged bartender. “Let me see if I can get it to work.” He tossed his towel over his shoulder and disappeared into a back room.

I tried to figure out what he meant by “get it to work,” until I realized what was on two of the TV screens. A Windows desktop. I pointed this out to my companion.

“If he moves that cursor, we’re going to have to leave,” I said.

“Why’s that?”

“I think he’s going to stream it.”

Avoiding the Internet is really difficult to do. It’s how I watch most of my TV shows, movies and sports games. Miller is going without the Internet to find a better place of mindfulness. He has found, however, that escaping the Internet is easier said than done.