Episode 118: Apple Watch initial impressions

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Last episode, we said that fashion was really important to making any wearable, well, wearable. Did Apple deliver?

Or did Apple coming out with the Samsung Galaxy Gear 2.0, or worse, Google Glass 2.0?

One of us is probably going to buy an Apple Watch. One of us isn’t going to. Find out why.

We also talk about the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus and the future of smaller smartphones.

Pat’s quest to keep smaller smartphones going may be coming to an end.

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Episode 117: Wearable fashionistas

No.

No.

This is first of our podcasts on wearable computing. This one focuses on fashion, and how that is important to getting people to want to wear technology. Hello Google Glass!

Our next episode is all about the Apple Watch and our impressions of it.

How important is fashion to wearable devices? People wear watches mostly because they look good. Any smartwatch will have to at least look good, let alone work well.

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Episode 116: Brienne of Wisconsin

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We discuss the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and what it means for philanthropy and whether or not you should feel obligated to donate to it.

Neither of us has taken the challenge. Find out why.

We also discuss the celebrity photo hacking scandal and what users and phone makers can do to help secure data better.

This show has not one but two encore endings, so stick around.

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Don’t want your nude photos leaked on Internet? Set up two-factor authentication on your iPhone

You don't want to be an iCloud photo sharer.

You don’t want to be an iCloud photo oversharer.

It’s terrible that hackers have stolen nude photos of famous actresses and are sharing them on the Internet, but hackers will try to steal anything and everything that isn’t bolted down.

By default, Apple saves every photo you take with an iPhone to the cloud. It’s a very dangerous phone to sext with, particularly if you haven’t taken good security measures before you start sexting.

A password is not enough. Most of you use really weak passwords, and thus they are kind of worthless. Even if you use a really strong password, social engineering can allow a hacker to reset your password. Those security questions that websites have begun requiring for extra security are either worthless or counter productive.

This is a disposable security code that acts at the second level of authentication for my iCloud account. Once used, the code no longer works.

This is a disposable security code that acts at the second level of authentication for my iCloud account. Once used, the code no longer works.

But two-factor authentication is the real deal. In order to log into an account with two-factor authentication you need both a username and password and a second authentication, usually a code sent to your mobile phone. Even if a hacker has managed to get your username and password correct, they almost assuredly won’t have access to your mobile phone, and without access to your mobile phone to grab a one-time pin, no one can access your account.

iCloud is a great way to automatically back up iPhones and iPads. It, however, backs up everything, even nude photos. If you’re going to be taking nude photos, you should enable two-factor authentication immediately. Even if you aren’t into sexting, I highly recommend using two-factor authentication wherever possible.

I want to make this clear that iCloud’s automatic backups are a great thing. Most of you are very bad at backing up your data. But please take better security measures; there are some very bad people out there, and you deserve better.

Here’s how to set up two-factor authentication for iCloud and your Apple ID:

  1. Go to My Apple ID
  2. Manage your Apple ID
  3. Password and security
  4. Two-step verification
  5. Write down your recovery key and store it in a fire-safe box or somewhere else safe in your house

Dropbox increases consumer storage plan to 1 terabyte

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Dropbox announced a big storage increase on its entry-level Pro plan from 100 GB of storage to 1 TB (1,000 GB).

Dropbox increased storage a few years ago, but it was only a bump from 50 GB to 100 GB. Another storage bump up was expected but not to this extent. This changes how you can use Dropbox. Now most users can use Dropbox both as a syncing service and a backup service, whereas 100 GB of space was not enough to back up many people’s home computers.

Because of the lack of storage space, I was planning on canceling my Dropbox Pro account. It’s not enough storage to backup even my laptop, and Apple’s new iCloud Drive will handle syncing for me (even to my PC). I imagine a lot of people were considering the merits of Dropbox lately.

Dropbox has been facing increased pressure from backup services such as Backblaze, and syncing and storage services such as Microsoft’s OneDrive and Apple’s iCloud Drive. For online backups, a dedicated service like Backblaze is still superior (especially if you’re not fastidious with where you store your files), but at least Dropbox now offers enough storage for most people.

Dropbox is also rolling out new features such as remote wipe in case a device is lost or stolen and much more robust sharing controls. These power-user features may be enough to entice users to choose Dropbox over the built-in OneDrive and iCloud.

iCloud Drive is launching this fall and now every iPhone, iPad and Mac will come with this online storage and syncing service built-in. The only way Dropbox can compete with that and Microsoft’s OneDrive is on price and robust cross-platform compatibility.

I do wonder if this will cause Apple to bump up the storage on iCloud Drive before it launches this fall? In particular, Apple should offer more free storage to have parity with competitors. Apple is going to offer 200 GB of storage for $3.99 a month, which is a much better deal for your average user than Dropbox’s new plan, but quite a bit more expensive per GB than what Dropbox is offering.

Will these new plans and features be enough for Dropbox to keep me as a customer? That will depend on how good iCloud Drive is. Price isn’t everything, and Dropbox has worked very, very well for me over the years. And these new features and pricing have gotten my attention.

Episode 115: God, I’ve got to click on that! What happens next?

Upworthy, the shitty website on the Internet.

Upworthy, the shittiest website on the Internet. The original click-bait whore.

Click-bait, click-bait, click-bait. It makes our blood boil.

We discuss click-bait headlines. Facebook empowered them and now wants to do away with them. You can personally thank Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook for the rise of Upworthy and its crappy brethren.

Facebook killing click-bait is good for news publishers and blogs that don’t want to trade in click-bait.

We also discuss Facebook vs Twitter for getting news and information. A lot of people have complained that news shows up slower on Facebook than on Twitter. Can you get news in real time on Twitter? Does it even matter if Facebook is different at showing news than Twitter?

We finally discuss how Uber is trying to illegal kill competition in the ride sharing business. There’s a rant involved about that.

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Episode 114: #Ferguson

The Twitter hashtag #Ferguson has been very active over the last week. Right now it's mostly people posting opinions back and forth, but at night it becomes lively with first-hand accounts.

The Twitter hashtag #Ferguson has been very active over the last week. Right now it’s mostly people posting opinions back and forth, but at night it becomes lively with first-hand accounts.

We start off the show discussing Twitter parodies and satire.

Journalism Professor Jeff Jarvis has had enough with the parody account Prof. Jeff H. Jarvis. Could Twitter handle parody accounts better? We discuss the value of satire and parody on Twitter.

We then transition into a discussion of the events in Ferguson, Missouri, and how they are being broadcast around the world via social media. What exactly is a “free speech zone,” and how do you decide who is a journalist today? We begin talking about Ferguson around the 40 minute mark, if you’d like to skip ahead.

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Episode 113: Jeremy the bootlegger

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We discuss Gannett spinning off its print products into a separate company from its broadcast stations. This follows a similar trend that other media giants have done.

What is the future of print journalism? Is this good or bad for newspapers? Well that depends on debt. Debt is the big thing that no one talks about when it comes to journalism and innovation.

It’s a short episode this week because Jeremy has dreams of being a 1920s bootlegger and is off to Canada to score some booze.

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Episode 112: Daddy bloggers (also streaming video for sports sucks)

MLS Live may be cheap, but the blackout restrictions are onerous. A bad way to grow a new sports league is to make it really hard for people to watch your games. That's a pro tip right there.

MLS Live may be cheap, but the blackout restrictions are onerous. A bad way to grow a new sports league is to make it really hard for people to watch your games. That’s a pro tip right there.

Pat is back from paternity leave.

Jeremy and him discuss becoming Daddy Bloggers, because parenting blogging could use a softer touch. Tech. Dads. Awesome.

We also discuss streaming video with the NFL, MLB, MLS, etc. None of these leagues do it well, and it’s really holding back soccer from catching on in the U.S., in particular. Also, Jeremy is not “eligible” to get NFL Sunday Ticket streaming this year after having it for a few years. What is up with that? Blackout restrictions suck.

You can get around most blackout restrictions be either using a VPN or a proxy, which may be or may not be what I do with MLS.

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Episode 111: Facebook doesn’t believe in IRB or telling users before they’re test subjects

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Pat gets ready to have a baby.

We also discuss Facebook experimenting on users without telling them, and we explain the important of IRB (Institutional Review Boards) when conducting research on human subjects.

We discuss why IRB approval is important for conducting research on human subjects, and the terrible experiments that led to it.

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